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Awareness

Web Accessibility Perspectives

Video Credits: WC3 Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)This link will take you to an external website in a new tab.

Keyboard Compatibility

All functionality must be usable with the keyboard. That is, users can access and move between links, buttons, forms, and other controls using the Tab key and other keystrokes. Websites should not require a mouse; for example, pop-up calendars should also let users type in a date. Read more about Keyboard CompatibilityThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Video Captions

Captions are a text form of audio information in video and animations. This includes the words that are spoken, who is speaking when it is not evident, and important sounds like music, laughter, and noises. Captions must be synchronized with the visual content to contextualize them. Read more about Video CaptionsThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Colors with Good Contrast

Colors must have sufficient contrast between text color and its background (technically called luminosity contrast ratio). This includes text on images, icons, and buttons. Also colors used to convey information on diagrams, maps, and other types of images must be distinguishable. Read more about Colors with Good ContrastThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Customizable Text

Some users need to be able to change the way text is displayed so that they can read the text. This includes changing the size, spacing, font, color, and other text properties. When users change these properties, no information or functionality should be lost, and the text should re-flow so users don’t have to scroll horizontally to read sentences. Text customization is more than the zoom functionality, which only changes the text size. Read more about Customizable TextThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Clear Layout and Design

The different parts of a web page must be easy to locate and identify. This includes navigation menus, links, and text sections. These should be at predictable locations and consistently identified. Also form labels and instructions have to be clearly associated with their controls. Read more about Clear Layout and DesignThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Speech Recognition

Speech recognition can be used for dictating text in a form field, as well as navigating to and activating links, buttons, and other controls. Most computers and mobile devices today have built-in speech recognition functionality. Some speech recognition tools allow complete control over computer interaction, allowing users to scroll the screen, copy and paste text, activate menus, and perform other functions. Read more about Speech RecognitionThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Text to Speech

Many computers and mobile devices today have built in text-to-speech software. Some people with disabilities, including people who are blind, use specialized software called screen readers. Screen readers provide important functionality such as navigating through headings, speaking image alternatives, and identifying internal and external links. They can also highlight the text as it is being read aloud for people to see and hear the content at the same time. Content must be coded properly so that all of the functionality of the text-to-speech software works with the content. Read more about Text to SpeechThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Understandable Content

Content must be easy to follow and understand for many users. For most content, this means simply avoiding overly complex sentences and jargon, and providing clear layout and design. For some complex content such as medical information, separate, easy-to-read information may be necessary. Read more about Understandable ContentThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Large Links, Buttons, and Controls

The area for clicking and tapping controls must be large enough for people to activate them. This includes links, buttons, checkboxes, and other controls. Small controls, and controls that are placed too close to each other, are difficult for many people to use. This is particularly relevant on mobile devices with small screens. Read more about Large Links, Buttons, and ControlsThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..

Notifications and Feedback

Users need to know what is going on, and get appropriate feedback during interaction. For example, users need confirmation messages when actions are completed, such as when forms are submitted. Also, error messages must provide clear directions rather than confuse users. Read more about Notifications and FeedbackThis link will take you to an external website in a new tab..